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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
branches of the u.s. military. we're in constant contact with them. i've just now come from the pentagon as you are aware our minister of defense ehud barak received the highest civil honor given by the secretary of defense to any civilian, the distinguished civil service medal. and i think that stands as a symbol of the deep and multifaceted relations between our two militaries. >> we're out of time. you're a historian. he just said ehud barack, that u.s.-israeli military relations have never been better. you agree? >> i agree. >> thanks for coming in. >> thank you, wolf. >>> in the wake of the scandal surrounding general david petraeus's affair and the investigations into several other high profile generals, does the u.s. military need an ethics boot camp? and more than a decade after a deadly crash, a u.s. airline gets its day in court. many of my patients clean their dentures with toothpaste. i tell them dentures are very different to real teeth. they're about 10 times softer and may have surface pores where bacteria can grow and multiply. polident is specifically designed to clean d
there's more money to be cut in contracting at the pentagon, you don't understand what has happened at the pentagon. >> as much as i love claire, those are not the painful cuts that have to happen. we have to look at deeper reforms to entitlements. >> it amazes me how republicans can sit there and label the earned benefit programs as the cuts that have to take place when we have been in two wars that weren't paid for and big pharma that took us to where we are. i mean, i think we're missing the conversation in in country. how did we get here? molly, how did we get so far in the hole? what did we do? >> well, we spent money we didn't have, obviously. now we're looking for a way to resolve that. i think what you're hearing, too, part of the nervousness and part of the problem pr republicans is the things they are talking about aren't popular. as you've talked about a lot, there's political will to raise taxes on the wealthy. there's political will to make cuts in the pentagon. there isn't political will to cut entitlements. so the kinds of things that republicans say they want to do,
to classified information. now, the white house denies this. "outfront" on the story, cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr. >> you don't think she's a little young for the hard stuff? >> washington says she's a killer. >> it's a hollywood spy thriller with as much oscar buzz as it has controversy. "zero dark 30" the story of the hunt for osama bin laden from the oscar winning powerhouse team of katherine bigelow and mark bowe recreates how it all happened, from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the film makers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the film makers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our sourcing pretty seriously, just in the same w
and the pentagon. >> there was an event where operatives were involved and they did not know until they got there that the hollywood people were going to be present. so which means their identity would have been shown. >> reporter: king questions whether the military was pressured to cooperate on the film. >> what access they were told to give, some resisted, some acquiesced. >> reporter: cia and pentagon officials say no secrets were given away. >> my understanding is the hollywood people got access to cia operatives, cia locations, that they had access to navy s.e.a.l.s which they should not have had. and i can't really go beyond that other than to say that now, this investigation has gone on and it's been expanded. >> reporter: bowe says he and bigelow were very aware of national security concerns. >> we're acutely aware that there are sensitivities around this material, and i think we approached this with a lot of respect for those sensitivities. >> pretty -- i really want to see this movie. it does raise a legitimate concern about how much cooperation there is between the cia, between
, the even say the pentagon or the size of the federal debt, like if you're the biggest debtor in the world take issued certain power. are you optimistic that these can be really reversed, like 30 seconds? >> i'm very optimistic about america's future. i think we have to approach the future with confidence. we have to get our house right at home but we have to be prepared to engage with confidence abroad. we still are that shining a light on the hill that people look to. they are disappointed when we don't deliver. we are disappointed when we'd don't deliver. i think we can both at home and abroad find a way. it's not going to be simple. our government takes longer to get things done and the real economy would like. we've got to intersect but at the end of the day i'm optimistic that we can move forward. >> thank you. thank you so much. [applause] >> i'm like doctor doom, i come on stage. the eternal foot man. >> if you missed any of the previous program you can see it in its entirety at the c-span video library. go to c-span.org. we are live at the newseum here in washington for remarks fr
in guantanamo bay. there are cases all across the u.s., the pentagon is now taking a position where it is saying arbitrarily that the act of receiving information by any journalist anywhere in the world, that the pentagon says is classified and publishing some portion of it, or quote from it is espionage. it applies to journalists and also applies to people within government. >> i understand your point. but the committee to protect journalists says about ecuador -- hold on. let me ask you the question. about ecuador, president correa has turned ecuador into one of the most restrictive nations for the press. i didn't agree to talk about the surveillance state. >> well, i'm sorry. look, do you want to bring my p.a.s on? please, please. so, look. let's be honest. we have a serious situation here. whatever little things that are occurring in small countries are not of concern. >> this country -- ecuador is the country that is preventing you from being arrested the minute you walk outside the door. >> including the united states, including western europe, including france, including what was happenin
military. we have to maintain readiness. anybody who says we can't cut anything out of the pentagon has not spent the time i have in the pentagon. there's been a lot of money wasted through very wasteful practices, particularly in the space of contracting. if we don't get this fixed now, we'll be right back repeating the same mistakes the next time that we find ourselves putting men and women's lives at risk on behalf of our nation. >> you feel like the discussions that are happening right now around the defense bill and some of the things you have worked on, you feel like it's potentially ground to move forward? >> i do. and the main thing is to not go on to the next shiny object. we need to stay in this space, make sure we debate the issues fully, set policy clearly and then hold them accountable. hold their feet to the fire and make sure we don't go back to bad habits and some of decisions, people understand what the ground rules are. >> it's times like this you have to be focused on having the best debate. >> that's exactly right. >> congratulations on your win. >> thank you very mu
, if the pentagon things they want men in combat and not women in combat to win wars, the court is very hesitant to tell the generals how to run the battle field and what you found is the distinction between combat and non-combat is blurred, and you send a woman over there in a non-combat role and you know what? she's in combat all of a sudden when there are attacks because there's no front line. she, however, is not getting paid the same amount of money and not getting the same ability to get promotions as the men, so this lawsuit is saying something different than prior lawsuits which is basically the roles have been blurred, and these women are really in combat and they are not being paid for it. there are interesting arguments here, randi. >> this certainly is not the first time, no women in combat policy has been challenged and come into play. this is very different, you say, but how have the challenges fared in the past? >> they haven't fared very well in the past, and i think number one the reason originally was, you know, women were considered to be too delicate and tender and feminine t
. >> i was reporting from the comfort of the north lawn, the physis and the pentagon and a warehouse and it troops surged numbers. in new one and was about more of them while was reporting on. lou: your focus on this particular panel who, he targe of more than 225 individuals when. >> i work done for two and a half years in new will learn. it was a big project. every time i thought i was done, no, he need to talk to this guy. alternately and just said the stock because there will never be a time when i talked to everybody. lou: you were pursuing one of the toughest explanations of how those tend to be, and he the target. and it would been detected low will. >> pile was enough to hospital with my newborn son we want. of a corner of my eye and saw the story about the attack this coverage was all along the lines of, why would anybody put an outpost there. the chemistry that i needed to solve it. why would you put our troops in such a vulnerable position, but then it became partisan line to be so outnumbering. the stories suspect him remarkable. we cover the war among but we don't re
31, $650 billion in cuts to pentagon and domestic programs and tax increases will automaticly go into effect. republicans are complaining. democrats are not playing fair. >> democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. secondly, no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. this is not a game. >> carolyn: joe biden went christmas shopping in the capitol at a discount store. he strolled into costco and buying apple pie. he told reporters falling o-cliff klif is not an option. >> look around here. consumer confidence is growing. last thing we need to do is dash that now by being unable to extend middle-class tax cuts. >> carolyn: costco is hedging. they announced they will pay $3 billion dividend before the end of the year. that will save share hold ears lot of money. >> 138 countries voted to grant they voted against the measure which could make it easier for palestinian authority to pursue israel in international court. mahmoud ahmadinejad addressed the. >> mahmoud abbas addressed. they say they ne
anywhere in the world that the pentagon says is classified is spying and that is something that is plies to journalists and also to government. but they say about ecuador hold on. in less than five years. >> as we agreed -- >> the issue is the surveillance state. we are in a situation -- >> i didn't agree to talk about the surveillance state. >> i'm sorry. look, do you want to bring my pa's on? >> please please. >> so look, let's be honest. we have a serious situation here. whatever little things are occurring in this country are not our concern. >> it is the country that is preventing you from being arrested the moment you walk outside the door. >> including western europe and the former libya. we have researched it. we have documented it. >> then why will you not talk about ecuador? >> because it is insignificant. >> but it is the country that is enabling you to not be arrested. >> it is people have been generous to me. >> yes. >> but it is not a significant world player. >> south america and the developments that are happening there are interesting and significant and it is growing in
for the last -- since anybody can remember as the party that wants to rein in government spend รงpentagon. austerity regiment is a republican idea. when it comes time to put the your money where the mouth is, republicans are unable to identify significant cuts other than play on the margins? it makes my central point which is the tea party movement, which are the inmates in control of the asylum and republican party right now is an intellectually bankrupt movement. there is time to show the cuts and they can't do it. >> can i very quickly -- >> that was a psychiatric reference there, martin. you didn't cut him off on that. in fairness -- >> i just want to quickly say, in 2002 dick cheney said deficits don't matter. when republicans crammed through the bush tax cuts of 2001 and 2003 through reconciliation, they wrote them to expire. they are the ones who made them expire and they did it because it was an accounting gimmick to hide the cost of the bush tax cuts just as they hid the cost of the bush wars, which were also done off the books. they don't care about deficits. they care about fla
to perhaps pentagon spending. i'm looking at a graph that shows pentagon-related spending to be 60% of the budget. we need to change the focus away from the social safety net. all of the money goes back into the economy and perhaps some of the fat cats in virginia and other places that make lots and lots of money on defense spending. >> bill: got it, tony. >> tony, i just saw a graph. that senator manchin showed me yesterday. that showed that the troops -- we've actually -- we actually have the same number of troops we've had in the last few years. the huge increase in pentagon spending is consultants and is outside contractors. and even he was saying wait a second, we have to actually look at this. we have to look -- that's why the balance issue becomes so important. so instead of saying on the education spending, i can tell you what that money goes for. that money goes for head start slots. that money goes for making sure that in the kids who have gotten the worst end of the stick in the recession they get -- feder
, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. [ applause ] . >> our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, has more on what's going on. barbara, what are you hearing about syria and its chemical weapons sock pyles? >> reporter: well, president obama's words, wolf, so sharp, so pointed. and it's all because over the weekend, there was disturbing new intelligence out of syria. this syrian chemical weapons site near aleppo is just ten miles from the latest fighting. one of dozens of chemical weapons sites across syria. at at least one of these sites, u.s. officials say their latest intelligence shows syrian forces over the weekend began mixing two chemicals needed to make deadly seran gas, raising significant new concern that bashar al assad may be preparing a gas attack. >> we have made our views very clear. this is a red line for the united states. i'm not going to tell grapeelle in any specifics of what we would do in terms of credible evidence that the assad regime has resorted to using chemical weapons against their own people, but suffice it to say, we are certainly planning to take action
popular. if they want more entitlement cuts, more discretionary spending cuts, if they want pentagon cuts, the president wants them to specify them. and this offer is intended in part to say here's my math. here's the level of deficit reduction i can reach. if you think you can reach the same or more with more spending cuts, you go first and name them. >> yeah. >> so richard, we have everybody playing chicken for the most part. it's kabuki. you show your spending cuts and then i'll show mine. >> right. it failed before when the president was negotiating against himself. look, i'm going to come back. $400 billion of medicare cuts is exactly what you would want democrats to do if you want them to start dealing with entitlements. what are we talking about when we say democrats need to deal with entitlements? principally, it's medicare. so that's a huge down payment right there. you can say, well, i don't really believe they're possible, but that's a real proposal. what you're asking for in terms of the politics is that the president somehow solves john boehner's problems with his own caucus.
. but the pentagon insists he was held in accordance with the rules. if convicted, manning faces life in prison. >>> and in the democratic republic of the congo, the rebel group known as m-23 defied a call to withdraw from the city of goma. they say they're going the remain in control of the city until the demands are met. including releasing political prisoners and dismissing the national election commission. the congo administration minister -- residents fear they'll be caught in the cross-fire, and what's been happening there is hard to imagine. >>> bob dole has been hospitalized. an aide says dole self-checked into walter reid for a routine procedure and will be discharged tomorrow. they say he's doing very well. there were questions raised about his health today after senate majority leader harry reid indicated on the floor that he was there for something more than a check-up. he talked about his love for him. >>> well, it has been 481 days since this country lost its top credit rating. what are we doing to get it back? there's good news today, consumer confidence hit a new high, september
was mistreated while in military custody. but the pentagon insists he was held in accordance with the rules. if convicted, manning faces life in prison. >>> bob doll dole has been hospitalized. he checked in to walter reed for a routine procedure and will be discharged tomorrow. there were subcommittees raised about his health after harry reid indicated that he was at walter reed for more than just a checkup and described him as infirm. >>> consumer confidence hit a four-year high today. >>> and now our fourth story outfront. coming clean on benghazi. susan rice went to capitol hill today to clear the air. she said, look, the talking points i used after the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya were wrong. she met with three of her most outspoken critics, republican senators john mccain, lindsey graham, and kelly ayotte to set the record straight. rice had gone on five sunday talk shows days after the attack and called it a spontaneous demonstration sparked by an antimuslim film and did not mention the link to al qaeda. after all this taking on her critics, the republican senators weren't i
for you? >> no. the pentagon i have to say was fairly cooperative. there were different levels of competence when it came to specific public affairs officials. generally speaking, they were cooperative. but they want you to go through them and i didn't. i generally just found the troops on my own and they put me in touch with their fellow troops. it's interesting, when you were talking about the afghan soldiers, this something i haven't talked about in other interviews. one of the things that's interesting, as i went through the life of this one combat outpost from 2006 to when it's overrun in 2009, is the different levels of competence when it came to the afghan soldiers. unfortunately for the u.s. in that region, in regional command east, eastern afghanistan in 2009, it was one of the worst battalions of afghan soldiers ever. when it was attacked, when combat outpost keating was attacked, most of them ran away or hid or when through the american bar racks stealing ipods and computers. it's no surprise because actually a few months before at another combat outpost a similar th
who serve and sacrifice. this week, the pentagon released the names of two service members killed in afghanistan. the names of two service members killed in afghanistan. >>> and when we come back, this question, of all of the american presidents, who would you like to interview? made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70
the sequester, that's good, less spending. i'm in favor of looking at the pentagon spending and reforming how you get it and get the same amount of dollars. look at the government spending. >> not a common republican position. >> more common than you think, but it's not common in the appropriations committee that does armed services. i talked to one of the key guys over there and said how can i help you reform the pentagon? there must have been >> i bet congressmen love getting that call, grover norquist, how can i help? >> i start meetings that way. want to make the government more efficient, make it cost less and we are everybody's friend on that subject. ralph nader and i were lobbying the bush administration back in 2001. >> what about the second cliff, the bush tax cuts? >> i think -- you get towards the end in a thing and if the republicans have played it right, they said look, push it out a month or two weeks so you should never actually go over these things, just as you do with continuing resolutions. say, look, give it a week, two months. >> the president is not going to extend. he k
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)